Edward Hunt's Forest of Dean Miscellany

Fact, Fiction and Fantasy

Zurree! : Forest Talk

work in progress...

This vocabulary is a mixture of local dialect, old mining terms, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon etc, . . .

adit

A horizontal passage leading into a mine for the purposes of access or drainage.

a'n't

have not

agwain

going

agyun

again, against

aim

think, suppose, reckon: ‘I d’aim’, expect

ain

haven’t

aisne

small wood

alf-oaf

fool

allus

always

ar

or

arle

alder

astn’t

hast not

avore

before

awld

old

bait

food

bannut

walnut

bathered out

exhausted, tired

bellock

bellow, shout, cry

bile

boil

billyo

a great deal, quickly

bin

been

bist

to be: I be, ‘thee bist’ , art or are you

bistn’t

are you not

black lead

graphite, pencil

botcher

small salmon

bottle – no bottle

no good

boughton

purchased as opposed to home made: ‘a boughten cake’

boy-chap

youth, young man

breadtime

usually midmorning meal

brevetting

wandering about

browst

twigs

bruks

brooks

butt, butty

friend (from Butty system: Butty mann who employed mate)

buzz

bus, omnibus

bwoys

boys

byuns

beans

byunt

are not, am not

byut

beat

cawn’t

cannot

charcoal boards

fitted to wagon to hold charcoal which is bulky but light in weight

chops

teet or choppers, mouth

chunt

no, it is not

chup

cheap

chupper

cheaper

churn

underground cavity – a term used in the old iron mines indicating a large cavity filled with iron ore.

clacketin

chattering

clane

clean

clate off

clear off

clouted

hit hard

Coleford collar

scarf, muffler

comp

candle

const

canst, the archaic form of the auxiliary verb ‘can’

cooch, coochy

snuggle (a cooch is also a dog kennel)

coopies

an infantile word for fowls

cord

unit of volume of cut timber

cordwood

wood for stacking

cosn’t

cannot, used with pronouns thee and thou

costn’t

can’t

couldst

could

coustn’t

could not

cratur

creature, person in derogatory sense

crease

jacket or box of rock

crimes

an expression of astonishment

cun

can

cyawpsin’

too talkative, loquacious

daaze

euphemistic word for damn

daddecky / daddocky

partly rotten

daggled

exhausted, tired

dald

euphemistic word for damn

dap

bounce

dappy

bouncy

dekko

look

dip

deep

dipple

pit entered down steep incline

doan

don’t

doings

an unspecified object, a whatsit

douse, dout

put out (a fire)

dree

three

droo

through

drow

throw

duss

from the verb ‘to do’; I do, thee duss

dussent

do not

dust

do

dyud

dead

dyuth

death

elba

elbow

elder blo’

elder blossom

ellum

elm

ellum blo’

elder blossom

ern

either

ettles

nettles

ex

ask

exed

asked

exin’

asking

eye

island – as in Eye between the Severn and the Wye

feow

few

fer

for

feythur

father

fitcher

ferret (‘stink like a fitcher’).

flump

fall down

fower

four

frail

a small canvas bag

fust

first

gale

birthright, holding – an area of ground below which a miner has mineral rights.

gammy

imperfect

gaust

gorse

gaveller

 aForest of Dean mining official who deals with applicants for gales.

gawpin’

gaping

gid

gave

gidst

gave it

Glowecestscire

Gloucestershire (Anglo-Saxon)

gurt

great, big

gwain

going

gyule

sneer

hain

To enclose, as when part of a Forest is enclosed (to shut up fields for haymaking) hence – Haie or Hay.

hast

have you

hommocks, hummocks

Legs, shins

Herefordscire

Herefordshire (Anglo-Saxon)

ind

end

im

him

izzelf

himself

jadder

liar

jasper

wasp

jip

pain – ‘it didn’t half give me some jip’.

jud

dead

ketch

catch

kip

keep

kip

sleep

kipe, kuype

large basket for chaff.

knaw

know

knit up

draw up (hands by rheumatism)

lave

leave

lomber

climb awkwardly

lug

ear

lug

tow

lug pole

pole for shaking down cider apples or perry pears.

mane

mean

martal

mortal

meend

A village Common or Green; A large area of waste

mezelf

myself

mommuck

a mess

mon

man

moot

to root as pigs do

mullockin’

lazing

muntle

stupid person

muv

move

muvin

moving

nar

nor

nellie

stick to hold candle and with a pointed end to push into coal face

nern

none, neither, no one

nesh

tender, soft, delicate, not hardy, ‘you be got nesh’.

nigh

near, nearly

nithered

cold, frozen

nogman

stupid person, fool

nurped

the result of being ‘nesh’

nuthin’

nothing

ockerd

awkward

oik

lift, throw

oiked

lifted

olt

hold

on us

of us

on y’

of you

on’n

of him, of it

on’t

of it

ood

wood

oont

mole

oot

will you, ‘do that, oot!’

ootn’t

won’t you

oss

horse

ouja

an unspecified object

oultn’t

will not

owd

hold

owld, ow’

old, often used in an affectionate way

phizog

face

pig squeal, squeal

cider

pill

stream running into Severn, tidal creek

pizunuss

poisonous

pizzun

poison

plaze

please

pooer

poor

pudding stone

a consolidated gravel conglomerate; the name given by quarry workers to conglomerate.

purlieu

(pearly, purlu, Durla Barn, Dursley Cross (Baty p.8)

putcheons, putchers, putts

cone shaped baskets used to catch salmon, putts being larger than putchers

putt

put

quat, quatty

squat, crouch, sit

quist

wood pigeon

quomp

to stop, to put pay to

rade

read

radin

reading

rale

real

rasty

rancid (of bacon); nasty (of person). He’s getting rasty.

rinnuck

small pig in litter

ronk

rank, sexy, crafty

Sallowvallets

salh = willows, fœllet = clump of felled trees

sawney

soft, daft

scowle

Cavity, hole (open to surface) – areas where there are ancient shallow workings for iron ore in the Dean.

“Scowle” seems to be derived from the Welsh “ysgil” signifying a recess

Sæfern

Severn (Anglo-Saxon)

sh’ink

should think

shawin’

showing

shep, ship

sheep

ship badger

one who runs sheep in the Forest

shuck

shook

sknaw

short for theesknaw, you know

smirkin’

smiled falsely

smot

to throw, threw, placed, to hit, to break

smot up

dirty, as to be smot up with dirt

socked

hit very hard

spitter

spade

sprack

lively

spwile yups

spoil heaps

spwilin

spoiling

squap

to tread or lean unevenly

squit, squitter

nonsense (bull squitter, bull dung – hence ‘bull’ elsewhere).

squittered

gambolled, rushed haphazardly

strames

streams

strit

street

stunnem

a particularly strong cider once popular in th Forest

sturt

startle

stwun

stone

summat, stun

something

surrey

form of address (from sirrah?). See zurree.

swallad

swallowed

swate

sweet

swelp my bob

an exclamation

tanglefoot

cider

tater

potatoe

tats

Forest or Welsh sheep

tawld

told

teart

sharply painful

teel

to stack or set

theesknaw

you know

therzelves

themselves

theze

this

thic

that, that one, thiccy

thou’lt

thou wilt (you will)

thouse

thou dost (you do)

thouse

you have

tissucking

irritating (pertaining to a cough)

tith

teeth

trated

treated

tripe hound

silly person, a cur

tudjamler

tadpole, small fish

tuffut

turf

tump

A mound or barrow, hillock; A small hill, sometimes heap

tush

pull. tug

tushin’

carrying

twunt

it won’t

tyunt

it isn’t

ull

will

underd

hundred

undud

hundred

vark

fork

varm

form

veel

feel

vella

fellow

ver, vur

far

vern

helpmate (trainee Free Miner)

vetch

fetch

vire

fire

vit

feet, fit

vlat

flat

vling

fling

vlyin’

flying

volla, voller

follow

vorest

forest

vor’n

for him

vorrud, vorud

forward, forehead

vram

from

vull

full

vust

first

vut

foot

vyarn

fern

vyow

few

Wæge

Wye (Anglo-Saxon)

wapper

wasp

wast

were

watty-handed

cack-handed, clumsy

wayter

water

wazzle

tangle

wesh

wash

weshed

washed

wi

with

wi’n

with him

wiffle

stink

wik

week

winder

window

withies

a long flexible twig, as that of an osier (?)

witter

throw

woy

way

wum

home

wun’, wunt

won’t

wurrut

worry

wuss

worse

wuth

worth

yalla

yellow

yalla

yellow

yat

gate

yud

head

yun, yunt

aren’t or isn’t

yup, yups

heap, heaps, many, much

yut

eat, eaten, yet

zart

sort

zarve

serve

zed

said

zid

saw

zin

seen

zot

sat

zum

some

zummat

something

zurree!, zurry

sirrah! Anglo-Saxon form of address


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 For other articles featuring the Forest Dialect,
          click on one of the links below:

          Forest Dialect
          George Ridler's Oven
          Harry Beddington
          Jolter
          Vorester
          Yarleton Hill
          Zurree! : Forest Talk



          Learn Forest Speak (BBC)
          Forest Talk - Keith Morgan (BBC)


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Edward Hunt